African Odyssey – Kilombero River

Just fifteen kilometres from the city, yet a million miles from anywhere, before setting out on our train ride to Ifakara. This is our jumping off point for the river trip on the Kilombero River into the Selous, the world’€™s largest wildlife sanctuary a 50,000 square kilometres wilderness, with wondrous bird life, huge buffalo and elephant herds and the river full of dangerous hippo and crocs. This is the time of the great wildebeest migrations.

On this edition we will see: Hyenas, Lions, Wildebeest, Antelope, Elephants, and many more.

Purebred Dingoes In Need of Protection

dingo 04 Purebred Dingoes In Need of Protection

I once stood a few feet away from one of the last wild dingoes in Australia. I was visiting the World Heritage site, Frasier Island — or as the Aborigines named it, K’gari, meaning “paradise”. It is one of the world’s most notable eco-tourism sites and is the largest sand island featuring rainforests, crystal clear lakes, dessert dunes, and a 75-mile beach. It’s famous for its array of rare plants and animals, and is home to some of the last remaining purebred dingoes.

In 2004, these dingoes were listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. Today, conservationists in Australia are pushing for a national campaign to give the dingo formal protection as a threatened species. A campaign that could not have come soon enough, as the already few populations of purebred dingoes continue to dwindle closer to extinction.

The dingo (aka “Australia’s wild dog”) is the largest native carnivorous mammal in the country and plays a vital role in maintaining the balance within its vast ecosystems. Dingoes are agile hunters whose game includes kangaroos, sheep, and deer, and smaller animals like rabbits, rodents, birds, and lizards, as well eating fruits and plants. Their hunting is vital in keeping populations of their prey in check. Dingoes communicate with howls and hunt cooperatively like wolves, but they prefer to travel independently or in small family groups or pairs rather than large packs. Dingoes are distinguished from dogs and wolves by white markings on their chest, feet, and tail, and their color ranges from sandy yellow, to red, and even black.

dingo 01 Purebred Dingoes In Need of Protection

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Natural Kingdom Collection: Arctic Diamond Fever

This is the story behind the multibillion dollar fever that has led internationally renown geologists to the most unlikely place on earth – a land package the size of Texas in the empty, remote and vast barren lands of the Artic. Fueled by the fever of the hunt for that rare and precious find and in spite of deathly obstacles, geologists began what has become the biggest staking rush in world history. This is the search for the oldest, hardest, and most valuable gem in the world.

African Diaries / Marilin Lodge On The Islands off of Mozabique


This is a British Series which takes us on several trips to African Reserves. It’s a bit over the top and not my taste, but at least we do get to see a little bit of Africa.

Show text: For longs years it was gripped by a bitter and cruel civil war. The scars still show but the people are happy, upbeat and industrious. Now peace is like a port after stormy seas. The African sun follows its own clock and once set you’d best hurry. Sailing in a dhow with lateen rigged sail and harnessing the wind as centuries of seafarers have before, the flat seas of the Mozambique Channel are entirely unique. An unforgettable experience! The Mozambican water is clear and the richly populated reefs swarm with green turtles, butterfly fish, angel fish, sea anemones… an underwater paradise and a fisherman’s delight!

African Odyssey – Return to Sausage Tree Camp, Lower Zambezi Valley, Zambia

It is the magic of the river with it’s huge flood plains that have lured us back. Huge swilring dunes at sunrise w/patterns on the sand tell a story of wildlife that emerge on ly at night to feast. It’s images such as these that pulled me back to Lower Zambezi.

This edition is all about the vast amounts of water, within the park at this time of year. Bring along with it, an explosion of life.

On this edition we will see: Giraffe herds, Springbok, Gemsbok, Water Birds, Elephants, King Fisher, Hippos,

Japanese Crane Demands People Food

japanese tancho crane008 Japanese Crane Demands People Food

The Japanese tancho crane is in a precarious position. And it’s not impending extinction – at least not in the way you normally think. While numbers are low (an estimated 1,200 tanchos exist in its natural marshland habitat of Hokkaido in Japan, with an additional 1,400 thought to live in Russia and China), the crane population is actually the highest it’s been in 100 years. Granted, it’s still one of the most endangered birds in the world, but when you consider that it was thought to be extinct until 10 birds were discovered in the 1920s, 2,600 is not bad at all.

japanese tancho crane001 Japanese Crane Demands People Food

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African Odyssey – Masa Mara

One and a half million wildebeest accompanied by vast numbers of zebra will attempt the crossing of the Mara River. An awesome sight as many get swept away or are taken by crocodiles in the fast flowing current. We also follow a pair of mating lions as they go through the process of mating 100′s of times, while two competing males follow the couple, waiting for a chance to mate as well.

On this edition we will see: Hyenas, Lions, Wildebeest, Antelope, Elephants, and many more.

African Odyssey – Victoria Falls/Hwange

We drive through the Zambezi National Park to Hwange National Park a 15000 square kilometres of Kalahari Sand country and home to a wider diversity of animals, because of the lack of predators. There are no lions in this park, Leopards are the only predator left in the park and is way to small to take down the large prey species, like the water buffalo. This is home to the great Victoria water falls.

On this edition we will see: Rhino, Buffalo, Zebra, Elephants, New Born Baby Elephants, termites.

Dr. Bob Arnot Explores An Elephant Reserve In Botswana

The former on air NBC reporter Dr. Bob Arnot has moved on to his own reality show he called Dr. Danger. I am not sure if I can get into that name, but the show seems to be doing well and is now in it’s second season on the Mojo HD Network. Dr. Arnot, travels the world looking for dangerous / adventures stories to tell.

abucamp elephants 01 Dr. Bob Arnot Explores An Elephant Reserve In Botswana Continue Reading / Additional Photos / Videos

African Odyssey – Deception Valley Lodge, Botswana, Kalahari

Botswana, from the caravan ride i t appears to be a desertw/no sign of any surface water, yet it supports a vaired wildlife population. A refuge for bushmen,the last of hunters and gatherers descendents of Southern Africas earliest residents

It Takes Just One Village to Save a Species

white headed langurs It Takes Just One Village to Save a Species

Long ago, in the poverty-stricken hills of southern China, a village banished its children to the forest to feed on wild fruits and leaves. Years later, when food stores improved, the children’s parents returned to the woods to reclaim their young.

To their surprise, their offspring had adapted to forest life remarkably well; the children’s white headdresses had dissolved into fur, tails grew from their spines and they refused to come home.

At the Nongguan Nature Reserve in Chongzuo, Guangxi province, the real-life descendants of these mythical children — monkeys known as white-headed langurs — still swing through the forest canopy. Continue Reading / Additional Photos / Videos

Animal Rights Special on National Geographic

Should animals have the same rights as humans? The National Geographic show Inside Base Camp presents the controversial proposition of animal rights. Guest include professor Steven Wise, the author of Drawing the Line: Science and the Case for Animal Rights.

From Wikipedia: Wise’s position on animal rights is that some animals, particularly primates, meet the criteria of legal personhood, and should therefore be awarded certain rights and protections. His criteria for personhood are that the animal must be able to desire things, to act in an intentional manner to acquire those things, and must have a sense of self i.e. the animals must know that s/he exists. Wise argues that chimpanzees, bonobos, elephants, parrots, dolphins, orangutans, and gorillas meet these criteria. Continue Reading / Additional Photos / Videos

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