Fig Bars By GreenChefs Golubka

fig bars raw food recipe 01 Fig Bars By GreenChefs GolubkaPhotography Golubka

Now, here’s a cooking mystery that I’ve been trying to solve. The original fig bar recipe calls for coconut oil in the “dough” part instead of the almond butter that I used in my adapted version. I’ve tried to use coconut oil, but it immediately went rancid in the dehydrator. I didn’t give up easily and tried to use different brands of coconut oil, but the result was always the same – rancid. I’m puzzled – it never happens when I use coconut oil in other recipes that require dehydration. If you happen to know the reason, please let me know. I’m truly curious.

The recipe is adapted from Living Raw Food recipe book by Sarma Melngailis Her Official Site / Sarma’s G Living Section

fig bars raw food recipe 02 Fig Bars By GreenChefs Golubka

For the Dough & Filling

8 cups sprouted oat flour

2 cups maple syrup powder

1 cup raw almond butter

1 cup date paste

1/4 cup vanilla extract

1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoon purified water

The Filling

6 cups fig paste (see below)

1/2 cup raw agave syrup

Instructions
For The Dough: In a large bowl, sift together all the dry ingredients. Add the almond butter and mix thoroughly. In a separate bowl, mix the date paste, vanilla extract, and water. Add to the dry mixture and combine well.

For The Filling: To make fig paste, soak any kind of dried figs for 8 hours. Then blend in a food processor, adding the soaking water as needed to achieve a smooth consistency. Keep refrigerated in an air tight container.

Assembly
In order to form the bars, you will need two trays that fit in the bottom of your dehydrator. We use half-sheet pans that can be found at any restaurant supply store.
Line the two pans with parchment paper. Divide the dough equally between them and press into the pans to achieve a uniform thickness. Using a knife, cut the dough in one of the pans into 4 even parts. Place that pan into the freezer for about 10 minutes, so that it becomes more firm for easier handling.
Meanwhile, mix the fig paste with the 1/2 cup of agave, and evenly spread this mixture on top of the uncut dough in the second pan. Remove the first pan from the freezer and carefully place each quadrant on top of the fig paste layer.
Place the sheet pan in the bottom of the dehydrator and dehydrate at 115F for about 6 hours. Remove from the dehydrator, cover with parchment paper and invert your second empty pan on top of it. Carefully flip over, holding both pans together and remove the upper pan. Peel away the parchment paper and place back into the dehydrator for another 6 hours. Once removed from the dehydrator, cut through all the layers to form bars of any size you like. I cut each quadrant in half lengthwise, then across into 8 sections to make 64 bars. Transfer the bars onto screen-covered dehydrator trays and dehydrate for another 10 hours.

Another great thing about these bars – you can always order them online through One Lucky Duck, or pick one up at their takeaway in NYC.

fig bars raw food recipe 03 Fig Bars By GreenChefs Golubka

  • JellyBelly

    credit should go to Matthew Kenny and Meredith Baird from Everyday Raw Desserts – this is beautiful reinterpretation!

  • Heath

    I’ve had every recipe I’ve made in the dehydrator with coconut oil and oat flour go rancid. It sucks and it’s a waste of ingredients. Maybe it’s just the combination of the two?

  • Juan

    I really don’t know if this is the reason of coconut oil going rancid but fig is one of the few fruits that have proteolytic enzymes that denaturalizes proteins. For example fig is used in hard meat receipes to soften it, I hope not being banned for using the m… word :)

  • Juan

    I really don’t know if this is the reason of coconut oil going rancid but fig is one of the few fruits that have proteolytic enzymes that denaturalizes proteins. For example fig is used in hard meat receipes to soften it, I hope not being banned for using the m… word :)



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