FIJI GREEN

fiji FIJI GREEN

I have a dirty little secret — I’ve had a long love affair with FIJI water for years now. I’ve even thought about disguising it in Sigg Water bottles, so no one would know what I was drinking and try to run me down with their Prius. It’s just water, yet I feel like I’m carrying around an open bottle of whiskey in a church.

Honestly, I’ve tried to like other waters but just couldn’t. At one time I was on an Avian kick cause I liked their water coming in glass, but then once I discovered FIJI I kicked them to the side. It’s really hard to go back to anything else – everything else just tastes weird to me. Don’t even get me started on the evils of tap water.

Sorry if I find it repulsive to chug down glass after glass of glorified pool water. Just because a water is (somewhat) clear, doesn’t mean that H20 is all that is lurking in it. A chemical cocktail of chlorine, something resembling synthetic “fluoride” and other industrial waste chemical runoff and pesticide runoff. What they put in the water isn’t really genuine fluoride but fluorosilicic acid which is a by-product and toxic waste from the manufacture of phosphate-based fertilizers. This fluorosilicic acid is contaminated with arsenic and other contaminants from the fertilizer production.

Not only does all that not sound the least bit appetizing, I doubt it could be that healthy either. Bottom line is I don’t know what is in the tap water or even how many heavy metals and how much rust have absorbed into it from the pipes. The filter on our sink gives very questionable tasting water as well. I doubt it’s removing that much from it, and none of the filters remove the “fluoride” chemicals. Some things just can’t be removed from water, even with reverse osmosis – like arsenic, pesticides, fluoride, antibiotics and other environmental pollution.

What I love about FIJI water is the taste — or rather the lack thereof. Most waters always have somewhat of an aftertaste or metallic taste to me. FIJI just has a very smooth feel and virtually no real flavor. It just tastes pure. I’m sure it’s all subjective, but after reading the book Water & Salt, that went into detail about the benefits of Artesian water and particularly of FIJI Artesian water over other types of water, I was sold. This isn’t filtered tap water thrown in a bottle like most other water companies. You can’t make this water out of tap water. FIJI water is protected from pollution and pure, 450 years old, high in absorbable colloidal silica, low in sodium, alkaline with a PH of 7.5, and it is naturally structured. You’ll have to read the book to get all the details on the unique biophysical and energetic properties of the water, but basically it’s more like a nutritional supplement and homeopathic to me then just a water.

I do recycle every single bottle. Yet, despite virtually every other type of packaged drink being pardoned by the “green police” — from sodas, teas, beers, and energy drinks (which by the way all contain mostly water), bottled water has been cast as the ultimate symbol of “anti-green”, and FIJI is the most targeted of the bunch for some reason. Yet ironically, out of all the bottled water companies out there, FIJI Water is leading the effort to reduce their carbon footprint. In fact, they just came out with a new initiative called FIJI GREEN. Their mission is to become the first in the water industry to become “carbon negative” in 2008, by cutting emissions across their products’ lifecycle, and investing in forest carbon and renewable energy projects. They are reducing the amount of packaging in their products by 20% and are expanding recycling programs and incentives. While they do use plastic recyclable PET bottles instead of glass, they claim that they require 24% less energy to produce, 40% less solid waste, and emit 46% less carbon then glass. Their goal is within 2 years to have 25% fewer emissions and for 50% of their energy and transportation fuels to come from renewable green sources like wind power and bio-diesel. They have also partnered with Conservation International to save the largest lowland rainforest in Fiji, the Sovi Basin, protecting it from logging and keeping 10 million tons of carbon dioxide from being released from the forest.

So, in addition to giving back to the communities in Fiji and creating clean sources of drinking water, building schools there, and supporting numerous philanthropic organizations, FIJI water is now going green. They sound like a very socially aware company compared to many. I may not be switching to tap water or a soda addiction anytime soon, but at least I know my naughty little pure water habit will be supporting many good causes.



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