New Thinking Behind Cosmetic Market

foundationmakeup01 New Thinking Behind Cosmetic Market
(via nytimes.com) For a glimpse of what cosmetics marketing used to look like, flip through the recent book “Hello Gorgeous!� a collection of beauty-product advertising images from the 1940s, 50s, and 60s. “Glamour for You!� squeals one such ad for something called Stadium Girl Cake Makeup, featuring an apple-cheeked young woman and a promise to make the user’s complexion “more romantic than ever.� Elsewhere, a presumably satisfied cosmetics customer in a bridal gown is literally hauled off by a handsome man.

Whether you see such images as being shot through with optimism or just naïvete, it seems a long way from the sort of pitch used by Bare Escentuals, a cosmetics brand whose revenues for 2006 topped $300 million — more than double the figure from 2004. The most overt selling point for its foundations, eye shadows and other products is not the imagined Future You but the nitty gritty of the stuff itself. Its bareMinerals line of foundations — $25 for 0.3 ounce at Sephora — are made with “crushed minerals from the earth,� with no oils or preservatives; it’s “so pure you can sleep in it.� The company’s “patent-pending Rare Minerals Skin Revival Treatment� is actually meant to be worn while sleeping, making your skin “more luminous� all the while, thanks to a formula that includes “all 72 organic macro- and microminerals that exist in nature.� That one is $60 for .15 ounce.

An ingredients-based pitch seems a little crunchy for the mainstream, but then perhaps the mainstream has changed since the San Francisco company was founded some 30 years ago. (Back then it was basically a bath-and-body boutique.) Leslie Blodgett, the president and C.E.O., joined in 1994, starting bareMinerals the next year. She had been in the foundation division of Max Factor, where, she says, the focus was entirely on creating products that “would look great for three hours.� What happened after that, how uncomfortable it felt in the meantime or how much ended up “on your boyfriend’s shirt� wasn’t really important.

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