Pinkeye Medicine Stops Frog Fungus

frog breathing skin 01 Pinkeye Medicine Stops Frog Fungus

With its annual $7 billion dollar revenue, the beauty industry feeds on our love for hair spray, creams, deodorant, cologne and make-up. Unfortunately, so does our skin. Dr. Don Colbert says that poisons and cancer-causing substances can be absorbed slowly over time through the skin and lungs, collecting in the central nervous system, tissues, and organs, creating toxicity in the body.

As it turns out, we have a few things in common with frogs. Interestingly enough, frogs have lungs; but they have simple lungs, which means they must absorb oxygen from air and water through their skin. And just like us, this absorption can be deadly. Chytrid fungus, or chytridiomycosis, is a fungus attacking the amphibian population via the skin. More than a quarter of frogs worldwide have died from the fungus found in ponds and other water bodies they habitat.

And though we have yet to discover a guaranteed cure for cancer, other than preventative measures, there is a successful cure for the frogs. Scientists have discovered the antibiotic chloramphenicol, more commonly known as the medicine for pinkeye, cures 100 percent of treated amphibians. However, as Professor Jean-Marc Hero from Griffith University in Queensland, Australia says, “We can save species from the brink of extinction, but we can’t save species in the wild.”

Looks like the only problem left, is finding all those frogs.

frog breathing skin 02 Pinkeye Medicine Stops Frog Fungus

Resource, overview of the cosmetic industry



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