Yangtze River Porpoise Falls Prey To 800 Million Tons of Waste Per Year

yangtze river porpoise 011 Yangtze River Porpoise Falls Prey To 800 Million Tons of Waste Per Year

Not sure what concerns me more: the sad, seemingly hopeless plight of the Yangtze River Porpose or the fact that in China, this beautiful animal is referred to as the “river pig”.

Obviously, I’m more concerned about the former. Especially after reading a study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, which reveals that “the Yangtze River Porpoise, the only freshwater finless porpoise in existence, is in danger of becoming extinct”. The porpoise, which lives in the mid to lower reaches of the Yangtze and in the Poyang and Dongting lakes, is feared to soon suffer the same fate as the “baiji” or Yangtze River Dolphin. The cause of the encroaching extinction can be attributed to high concentrations of man-made chemicals found in the tissue samples of this aquatic mammal.

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Playing The Extinction Game | 300 Vaquita Left And Counting

vaquita dolphin 01 Playing The Extinction Game | 300 Vaquita Left And Counting

Vaquita is Spanish for “little cow”. Not sure how such a moniker became attributed to the world’s smallest porpoise, but that’s what the locals call it. However, vaquita might as well be Swahili for “vanishing”, because according to vaquita.org, it is the planet’s most critically endangered small marine mammal.

Found only in San Felipe and Roca Consag in the Gulf of California, this rare Mexican porpoise prefers shallow water and is usually spotted along the shoreline. Less than five feet long, the animal has a medium to dark gray body with beautifully distinctive black rings around the eyes and lips.

Unfortunately, the vaquita is dangerously close to extinction, with only an estimated 100-300 remaining.

vaquita dolphin 02 Playing The Extinction Game | 300 Vaquita Left And Counting

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