Media Watch | Good Morning America Show Us The Pacific Garbage Patch

America and the world are finally waking up to the massive trashing of the oceans. About a year ago, we posted our first story on the problem and since that time, it has been picked up everywhere. First on Oprah and now on Good Morning America. Lets hope all this exposure will mean something. We know we can see the actual surge of traffic to gliving.com, as the shows are seen in each new country.

Good Morning America: The world’s largest trash dump doesn’t sit on some barren field outside an urban center. It resides thousands of miles from any land  in the Pacific Ocean.

Bottle caps, soap bottles, laundry baskets and shards of plastic are just a few things that float in the ocean’s vastness. Known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, the “dump” is composed mainly of plastic, which isn’t biodegradable.

Instead, the plastic breaks down into smaller and smaller pieces in the patch that extends thousands of miles, from California’s coast to China. Charles Moore, who discovered the trash heap by accident in 1997 when he was sailing the Pacific, collects samples of the growing garbage bin. Some of his samples have contained six times more plastic than plankton.

“It is like a minestrone and … a lot of the vegetables are plastic,” said Moore, who stages regular trips to the garbage patch for research.

Video after the jump

good morning america 01 Media Watch | Good Morning America Show Us The Pacific Garbage Patch

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Fabien Cousteau Joins Oprah For A Show On The Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch stretches from the coast of California to Japan, and it’s estimated to be twice the size of Texas. “This is the most shocking thing I have seen,” Oprah says. Where did this trash come from? Marine biologists estimate that about 80 percent of the litter is from land, either dumped directly into waterways or blown into rivers and streams from states as far away as Iowa.

Like his grandfather, undersea explorer Jacques Cousteau, Fabien Cousteau has devoted his life to exploring and protecting the world’s oceans and sea life.

Many of those affected by the enormous garbage swirl—like sea birds, turtles and beluga whales—can’t speak for themselves. “They get caught in these nets, or they swallow some of these bottle caps,” Fabien says. “Killer whales, which are kind of our mirror, our canary in the coal mine, so to speak, are ingesting all sorts of things that are affecting their health.”

pacific garbage patch oprah Fabien Cousteau Joins Oprah For A Show On The Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

ORV Alguita Tracks Devastating Effects of Plastics

plastic beach 05 ORV Alguita Tracks Devastating Effects of Plastics

Here’s something you may not know about plastic: every piece of it ever produced, since it came on the scene in the 1950s, is still with us today. And it isn’t going anywhere.

Plastic is a non-biodegradable substance. No organisms, no bio-engineered bacteria are coming to the rescue to break down the molecular make-up of any of the plastic we create. It’s here to stay. And a great deal of it is floating around a Texas-sized whirlpool called the Northern Pacific Gyre, which has become infamously known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

Update: Jacques Cousteau Joins Oprah For A Show On The Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch

A research vessel called the ORV Alguita, led by Captain Charles Moore, has been analyzing this gyre. Their latest research, which concluded in late February, entailed using what they call a Manta Trawler. The trawler is basically a fine net with a tail to make it look like a manta ray, with which they trawl across the gyre and collect samples. The samples are then analyzed to discover how the plastic accumulation is disrupting the ecosystem.

plastic beach 03 ORV Alguita Tracks Devastating Effects of Plastics

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

G Living1
Find us on Google+