China Committing Suicide With Toxic Industries, Corruption, Pollution and False Imprisonments

china polution massive growth 03 China Committing Suicide With Toxic Industries, Corruption, Pollution and False Imprisonments

There are many heroes behind the fight against global warming. Many of these heroes have a happy story to tell. Unfortunately not all of those who fight tooth and nail against government agencies and international organizations find themselves in the winner’s circle.

One of the saddest cases I’ve heard was profiled in a recent New York Times article. Mr. Wu Lihong., a former factory salesman from the Lake Tai area of China, is an eco-warrior. He dedicated 16 years of his life to trying to get the factories that were polluting the once beautiful lake to clean up the water and surrounding lands.

Lake Tai, China’s third largest lake, was once known for its crystal clear waters, whitefish, white shrimp and a famous Chinese delicacy, the hairy crab. The waters from the lake were used to irrigate rice patties as well as — through natural and man-made canals — provide a means of shipping out produce from the area. The Chinese also valued this area for its beauty.

china polution massive growth 04 China Committing Suicide With Toxic Industries, Corruption, Pollution and False Imprisonments

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Media Watch | Good Morning America Show Us The Pacific Garbage Patch

America and the world are finally waking up to the massive trashing of the oceans. About a year ago, we posted our first story on the problem and since that time, it has been picked up everywhere. First on Oprah and now on Good Morning America. Lets hope all this exposure will mean something. We know we can see the actual surge of traffic to gliving.com, as the shows are seen in each new country.

Good Morning America: The world’s largest trash dump doesn’t sit on some barren field outside an urban center. It resides thousands of miles from any land  in the Pacific Ocean.

Bottle caps, soap bottles, laundry baskets and shards of plastic are just a few things that float in the ocean’s vastness. Known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, the “dump” is composed mainly of plastic, which isn’t biodegradable.

Instead, the plastic breaks down into smaller and smaller pieces in the patch that extends thousands of miles, from California’s coast to China. Charles Moore, who discovered the trash heap by accident in 1997 when he was sailing the Pacific, collects samples of the growing garbage bin. Some of his samples have contained six times more plastic than plankton.

“It is like a minestrone and … a lot of the vegetables are plastic,” said Moore, who stages regular trips to the garbage patch for research.

Video after the jump

good morning america 01 Media Watch | Good Morning America Show Us The Pacific Garbage Patch

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

ORV Alguita Tracks Devastating Effects of Plastics

plastic beach 05 ORV Alguita Tracks Devastating Effects of Plastics

Here’s something you may not know about plastic: every piece of it ever produced, since it came on the scene in the 1950s, is still with us today. And it isn’t going anywhere.

Plastic is a non-biodegradable substance. No organisms, no bio-engineered bacteria are coming to the rescue to break down the molecular make-up of any of the plastic we create. It’s here to stay. And a great deal of it is floating around a Texas-sized whirlpool called the Northern Pacific Gyre, which has become infamously known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

Update: Jacques Cousteau Joins Oprah For A Show On The Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch

A research vessel called the ORV Alguita, led by Captain Charles Moore, has been analyzing this gyre. Their latest research, which concluded in late February, entailed using what they call a Manta Trawler. The trawler is basically a fine net with a tail to make it look like a manta ray, with which they trawl across the gyre and collect samples. The samples are then analyzed to discover how the plastic accumulation is disrupting the ecosystem.

plastic beach 03 ORV Alguita Tracks Devastating Effects of Plastics

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Pittsburgh Wins an Award, But L.A. Still Rules

pittsburgh wins a green award 01 Pittsburgh Wins an Award, But L.A. Still Rules

Here’s some big news for the week: the city of Pittsburgh wins an award. Hooray! The twentieth largest city in the United States, which is home to over 2 million people, takes home the prize for… oh, wait — hang on… better re-cork that champagne… Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

China’s Desperate Olympic-Sized Anti-Pollution Plan

china olympic sized anti pollution plan China’s Desperate Olympic Sized Anti Pollution Plan

What more important in China right now than business? Ensuring that the Olympics go as smoothly as possible. Already under fire from the international community about Tibet and Darfur, China doesn’t want any more adverse publicity to affect the games in the form of pesky pollution. In an effort to fulfill their promise of good air quality in the capital of Beijing, the government is about to embark on some pretty drastic measures.

A two-month plan of combating pollution beginning July 20 will hopefully yield clear skies by the August 8 Olympic start date. According to Du Xiaozhong, deputy director of the city’s environmental protection bureau, 19 heavily polluting plants would be shut down, construction sites involved in excavation or cement work will stop working and one-half of the city’s three million cars will be removed from the roads. Adding up to a serious halt in production.

china olympic sized anti pollution plan 01 China’s Desperate Olympic Sized Anti Pollution Plan

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Biodiesel Polluting Alabama River

biodiesel polluting alabama river alabama biodiesel corporation Biodiesel Polluting Alabama River

>Another setback in America’s love affair with the internal combustion industry came this week in a lawsuit filed by Alabama environmental group Black Warrior Riverkeeper. The suit claims that Alabama Biodiesel Corporation has, on at least 24 occasions, discharged waste into the Black Warrior river, causing an oil-like sheen and killing fish. The suit also mentions that Alabama Biodiesel operated for over a year without a pollution discharge permit.

Alabama Biodiesel is one of a host of “clean fuel” plants that have sprung up in the past year – there were only 90 in the U.S. in 2006, but 160 by the end of 2007. In this case, like with many of America’s good ideas, the race for the mighty buck has trumped long-sighted concerns about unintended consequences like pollution and other environmental impacts.

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Athlete Pulls Out of Beijing Olympics Citing Pollution

beijing olympics gebrselassie pollution Athlete Pulls Out of Beijing Olympics Citing Pollution

It’s another blow to the Beijing Olympics. Only this time it’s not political, it’s pollutional. Ethiopia’s world record marathoner Haile Gebrselassie announced that he won’t be competing in his normal events in this summer’s games because he’s concerned that Beijing’s pollution will exacerbate his asthma.

According to Reuters, the athlete said, “The pollution in China is a threat to my health and it would be difficult for me to run 42-km in my current condition.” Gebrselassie, who competed in 1996, 2000 and 2004, says he’s not pulling out altogether — he still plans on competing in the 10,000 meter race.

beijing olympics pollution gebrselassie Athlete Pulls Out of Beijing Olympics Citing Pollution

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Mercury Scare Slows Whale Consumption

navy sonar whales Mercury Scare Slows Whale Consumption

The incendiary issue of Japanese dolphin and whale hunting looks like it may be dampening as the nation loses its appetite for both big fish. However, this is due to health reasons and not ethical ones. According to the New York Times, laboratory tests last June revealed high levels of mercury in dolphin and pilot whale that were caught and sold in the old seafaring town of Taiji — Japan’s equivalent to Nantucket Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Nature Deficit Disorder | Coming To A City Near You

lastchildinthewoods 01 Nature Deficit Disorder | Coming To A City Near You

I try not to be paranoid about all the bugs, diseases, and mental traumas that await our children, but as a father of two, there’s one I can’t ignore: Nature Deficit Disorder. The term, coined by Richard Louv in his new book, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature Deficit Disorder, is intriguing in its veiled disgust for a world that increasingly encourages children to stay inside where it is safe, engage in virtual worlds, and experience nature as an academic exercise.

In a recent interview with Salon.com, Louv defines the disease as “the cumulative effect of withdrawing nature from children’s experiences,” in favor of organized sports, video games and 100s of television channels. But the problem isn’t just in children; it is a societal problem that has roots in man’s rather recent domination of nature. Simply put, humans are experiencing increased stress from a lack of being rooted in the natural world.

lastchildinthewoods 021 Nature Deficit Disorder | Coming To A City Near You

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Gender Imbalance | First Water Now Plastics

bottledwater Gender Imbalance | First Water Now Plastics

It’s old news that we’re in the midst of a Hollywood baby boom. But have you noticed that for every Suri, Violet, Shiloh and Harlow there’s only a Kingston or an occasional Jayden James to match?

Back in October, G Living reported a shocking gender imbalance among births in Russia, Greenland, and Canada, which was thought to be a result of toxins in the water. But the problem now seems bigger than we thought. And not just limited to remote bodies of water Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Steven Spielberg Pulls Out of Beijing Olympics

steven spielberg beijing olympics 002 Steven Spielberg Pulls Out of Beijing Olympics

It’s not just Hollywood’s actors who are getting involved in international politics — directors are now also calling the shots (excuse the pun). Steven Spielberg just announced he was pulling out as artistic adviser to this summer’s Beijing’s Olympic Games, citing China’s lack of commitment to resolving the humanitarian crisis in Darfur. Ouch.

In a statement, Spielberg said “I find that my conscience will not allow me to continue business as usual.” China has increasingly been under fire from Darfur advocates. Two thirds of Sudan’s oil is sold to China, the proceeds of which are used to finance the genocide.

“Sudan’s government bears the bulk of the responsibility for these ongoing crimes, but the international community, and particularly China, should be doing more to end the continuing suffering there,” Spielberg said in his statement. “China’s economic, military and diplomatic ties to the government of Sudan continue to provide it with the opportunity and obligation to press for change.”

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Man-Made Chemicals Causing Gender Imbalance?

inuit 002 Man Made Chemicals Causing Gender Imbalance?

If you’re like me, the first thing you think of when someone mentions toxins in the water stream is the three-eyed fish on The Simpsons. Okay, maybe not. It might be oil or farming or Africa. It might even be Erin Brockovich. But with so many random chemicals finding their way into large bodies of water, it’s not surprising that animals — and the people who eat them — are experiencing irreversible affects.

In the northern regions of Russia, Greenland, and Canada, the historically nomadic Inuit tribes are producing more girls than boys, at a ratio of 2:1, according to scientists from the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP). And they believe the water is to blame.

While the effects of man-made chemicals in the water may sound small, they could possibly have a profound effect on the existence of this indigenous culture. With an approximate population of 150,000 Inuit people worldwide, it’s crucial to take into account the fact that in villages near Thule, Greenland the women are only producing girl babies.

inuit 003 Man Made Chemicals Causing Gender Imbalance?

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

G Living12Next
Find us on Google+