Anyone Ready For A Creamy Apple-Anise Soup and Pumpkinseed Cheese By GreenChefs Golubka?

apple anise soup raw vegan 01 Anyone Ready For A Creamy Apple Anise Soup and Pumpkinseed Cheese By GreenChefs Golubka?Photography Golubka

Some foods have a distinct seasonal disposition. Ice cream for summertime, apple pie in the autumn, hot soup during winter, and roasted artichoke in the spring. Well, I have a feeling that this soup surpasses seasons. It’s both light and hearty and is just as delicious chilled as it is warm.

I often daydream about food and make up different recipes while doing things unrelated to cooking. Well recently, in the middle of a daydream, I got an idea for making a soup that would have nut milk for its base. I imagined a bowl full of soup that is “blond” and creamy, and became excited about the possibilities of the milk’s earthy flavour.

It took quite a bit of experimentation until I was able to minimize the ingredients to two simple companions to almond milk – apple and fennel. Combined with the milk’s nutty taste, the two bring a sweet and fresh presence to the bowl. The spice of chili and coriander deepens the flavour and ties the whole thing together with a slight kick. The use of nut milk instead of whole nuts makes for a much lighter soup.

Well recently, in the middle of a daydream, I got an idea for making a soup that would have nut milk for its base.

Pumpkinseed cheese is a fairly recent discovery. The first time I made it, I could not believe what a wonderful result I got with so few ingredients. It’s a bit like a cracker. A cheesy, healthy, and delicious one. I’ve made it very frequently over the past couple of months. It’s simple, and works as a wonderful snack or part of a meal. I like to serve the soup with this “cheese,” but it’s very possible to pair it with any crackers of your choice.

apple anise soup raw vegan 02 Anyone Ready For A Creamy Apple Anise Soup and Pumpkinseed Cheese By GreenChefs Golubka? Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

I Grew My First Pumpkin, Now Get Ready For A Raw Pumpkin Pie And The Best Damn Pumpkin Breakfast Smoothie… Period

pumpkin recipes bonzai aphrodite 01 I Grew My First Pumpkin, Now Get Ready For A Raw Pumpkin Pie And The Best Damn Pumpkin Breakfast Smoothie... Period

The pumpkin pictured below, Is that not the purtiest, most perfect pumpkin you’ve ever laid your eyes on?! Now I’m not normally one to brag, but I growed that big beauty up there and man, I am proud! It’s my first successful squash, my garden’s inaugural gourd. The primary pumpkin! And apparently when I get excited, I alliterate!

I was so enamored of this precious pumpkin. I knew I had to do it justice, to create something really special. Lucky for me, a pumpkin goes a long way! I spent the whole weekend carving, chopping, blending, juicing, and otherwise altering the darling orb into all manner of delightful delicacies. But first things first, the prep work:

The heavy melon was washed and halved, the innards removed. The seeds were cleaned and set aside for roasty toasty. From there, it’s a blank canvas . . .

pumpkin recipes bonzai aphrodite 02 I Grew My First Pumpkin, Now Get Ready For A Raw Pumpkin Pie And The Best Damn Pumpkin Breakfast Smoothie... Period
Photographer: Sayward Rebhal

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Holiday Japanese Pumpkin Pie (kabocha squash) By GreenChef Julie Morris

Japanese Pumpkin Pie kabocha squash Holiday Japanese Pumpkin Pie (kabocha squash) By GreenChef Julie Morris Photographer: Julia Morris

I wonder, will you secretly judge me if I admit to you that I don’t really like pie? Every year I’m reminded of my pie-oriented “skeleton in the oven,” thanks to all the holiday festivities. You can usually spot me fighting a cringe, as one pie after the next is passed before me, and I have to spontaneously compose a new, polite way to decline.

I can’t help it — I don’t like traditional pastry crust (boring), I don’t like perfectly good fruits smothered in some sugar goo, and I’m terribly sorry, but that pretty lattice pattern adorning the top isn’t going to do anything to get me more excited. Luckily there is, however, one exception to my no-pie rule: pumpkin pie.

I really get amped over a good pumpkin pie. (To be honest, I invariably get amped over a good pumpkin “anything.”) But as much my love is genuine, I can’t help but feel our favorite orange globes have enjoyed a little too much pop-star-style dependence in the winter squash world. Pumpkins continually overshadow a vast, deliciously endowed, and diverse spectrum of beautiful winter squash, time and time again in recipes.

I can’t help it — I don’t like traditional pastry crust (boring)

But not this year.

I don’t know who decides the “chic food trends,” but nonetheless this has really been the year of winter squash. These different “pumpkin cousins” have been the new darlings of farmer’s markets and chefs alike, and I am all too happy to participate in the fun. I have so many favorites: delicata, butternut, acorn, and for making pies, the undeniable winner in my book is kabocha squash — aka the “Japanese Pumpkin.”

With a pumpkin-esque shape, and bright beautiful orange flesh, kabocha appears to be very similar to a traditional pumpkin, with the exception of its dark green exterior skin. Where it really trumps other pumpkins though, is in its flavor. Kabocha is one of the most inherently flavorful squashes of all — which makes it ideal for a pie! What I love most about it though, is that it enables using a fraction of the amount of sweetener compared to a traditional pie recipe . . . and in this case that sweetener is healthy molasses-like yacon syrup. Together, these ingredients ensure that this pumpkin pie is not only superbly tasty, but that it also has something to truly be thankful for: health! Now that’s my kinda pie. Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Time To Harvest and Eat The Pumpkins

pumpkin harvest 03 Time To Harvest and Eat The Pumpkins

Pumpkins the quintessential Fall harvest. They always pop to mind when thinking about Halloween and the eerily glowing orange lanterns, or the traditional pumpkin pie served on Thanksgiving. However, pumpkins actually come in many shapes and colors with a tantalizing culinary versatility that takes on any flavor added to it — so it can be used in savory dishes just as well as sweet. You can incorporate pumpkin into everything from soups to ravioli, lasagna, risotto, pasta, salads, and tarts — to sweet pies, cheesecakes, breads and ice creams. Pumpkin marries well with warm spices like cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice, and cloves – as well as savory herbs like rosemary, sage and basil.

This autumn fruit (really a berry if you want to get technical) is in season from September – March and can be stored up to a month on your counter or up to 3 months in the fridge. For cooking, skip past the oversized watery pumpkins that are best left to carving funny faces into. Look for the smaller sugar-pie orange pumpkins or one of the various colored heirloom pumpkins for an adventurous and exotic twist.

pumpkin harvest 01 Time To Harvest and Eat The Pumpkins

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GreenChef Vanessa Sherwood | Carrot and Parsnip Fettuccine

carrot parsnip fettuccine01 GreenChef Vanessa Sherwood | Carrot and Parsnip Fettuccine

Carrot and Parsnip Fettuccine
with Pumpkin seed pesto and marinated mushrooms and cherry tomatoes (raw)

What a feast for the eyes! I believe presentation plays a huge part in the success or failure of a recipe. If something looks good, Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

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