The Great Seed Exchange / From The Bonzai Aphrodite Tiny Garden

sayward bonzai aphrodite seed exchange 01 The Great Seed Exchange / From The Bonzai Aphrodite Tiny GardenPhotographer: Sayward Rebhal

Oh, deary me. Goodness goodness goodness. With a late spring, a miniature monster to care for fulltime, a foggy summer punctuated by unexpected heat waves, and most recently, two consecutive weekends away . . . it feels as though the world is conspiring against my garden. Ha! It’s just a hot mess up in there these days.

Oh well, I can’t complain! In this odd year of mostly hands-off-farming, I’ve actually learned a whole lot. And I’m so excited for next year! I can’t wait to implement all my new insights, and I just can’t wait to see this baby beast all covered in dirt and sprinkling seeds as he toddles along. We’re gonna have so much fun!

So speaking of seeds, I sort of have this grand idea. I want to organize an international seed exchange for Bonzai / G Living readers! I’ve always been enamored with the idea of saving seed – there’s something so inherently whimsical about this incredibly practical act. There are tons of really great reasons to do it, not to mention the fact that it’s just plain fun. I mean, talk about recycling!

I’ve written a bit about various seed-saving techniques, but the truth is, it’s fairly universal no matter the species. First, remove the plant part that holds the seeds. If it’s a pod or a flower, allow it to dry completely and then liberate the seeds. If it’s a fruit like a tomato or gourd, simply excavate the seeds and then allow them to dry out. Either way, collect your fully-dried seeds and label them clearly, storing in an airtight container (old spice jars work great). Easy as pie!

sayward bonzai aphrodite seed exchange 02 The Great Seed Exchange / From The Bonzai Aphrodite Tiny Garden Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Starting Your Garden | Sowing Organic Seeds

organic seed pod garden Starting Your Garden | Sowing Organic Seeds

Here we are in Early Spring, which means it’s time to get your garden going.

Before you order or purchase seeds, you’ll want to take into consideration the size of your garden plot. If you have limited space like most of us, it’s wise to narrow your selection down to your top priority plants. If you haven’t already done so, take a moment to make a list of the things you’d like to be harvesting this summer fresh from your garden.

It’s also practical to consider what will do best in your area. There are certain popular staples that will grow well most anywhere over the summer. For instance, in my small garden, I recently planted two dozen lettuce (in several varieties), a handful of kale, six basil plants, tomatoes and nasturtiums around the borders of the garden. At the very least, this will ensure that in a matter of weeks I’ll have greens for cooking, as well as plenty of pesto and multicolored salads garnished with tomatoes and edible flowers. My dream garden will be more complete, with an assortment of vegetables for any recipe, but this is undoubtedly a good step toward producing fresher and more vibrant produce for my dinner table.

organic seeds start garden Starting Your Garden | Sowing Organic Seeds

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

Dirty Minded Gardener Promotes Safe Seeds

seeds 002 Dirty Minded Gardener Promotes Safe Seeds

We’re just into mid-February and I can almost start to sense the days getting longer again. And while a die-hard gardener in a southern climate could probably keep some amount of food growing throughout the year, I, for one, seem to be getting more particular about the kind of weather I subject myself to.

And then there’s the issue of day length — day length fluctuation becomes more negligible the closer we get to the equator. Even in sub-tropical Maui, where the difference between summer and winter solstice is less than 2 hours, you can’t fool the plants. It’s the daily increase or decrease that affects them, not the length of the day. Whether or not the weather is cooperative, vegetative growth will slow nearly to a standstill around the winter solstice, regardless of where you’re growing.

seeds 005 Dirty Minded Gardener Promotes Safe Seeds

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

G Living1
Find us on Google+