Stunning Raw Japanese Colour Wheel Wraps by GreenChefs Golubka

Raw Japanese Wraps 01 Stunning Raw Japanese Colour Wheel Wraps by GreenChefs GolubkaPhotography Golubka

I am ever-captivated by the creativity and extravagance of Japanese cuisine. I could stare at this set of photos for hours on end, mesmerised and intrigued by the mysterious ingredients and the form they take. Only the Japanese can make food so aesthetic, vibrant, and unique – all at the same time. The combination of ancient traditions and brave modernism bring their food culture to untouched heights.

Here, we combined maki-sushi rolling techniques with our favourite spicy Thai wrap recipe. The result was exactly what I’ve imagined and dreamed of making – a flavourful and striking dish. This particular rolling technique is called Rokusha or colour wheel, a very appropriate title. The colourful wrappers alone can be eaten as a snack, kid-approved by Paloma. (The same recipe was used to make the edible leaves that accompanied our Halloween cookies).

I am always in a state of excitement when cooking, but preparing this dish left me especially exhilarated – so much visual stimulation!

Raw Japanese Wraps 02 Stunning Raw Japanese Colour Wheel Wraps by GreenChefs Golubka Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

GreenChef Matt Amsden | Fresh Italian Wrap Recipe

iwi GreenChef Matt Amsden | Fresh Italian Wrap Recipe

Fresh Italian Wrap (raw)

For the Sunflower Seed Cheese Sauce:

1/2 Cup Lemon Juice

1/2 Cup Soy Sauce (Nama Shoyu)

3-4 Cloves Garlic

2 Cups Ground Sunflower Seeds

Add all ingredients to a high speed blender and blend on high until smooth and well combined. Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

GreenChef Sarma Melngailis | Spicy Thai Vegetable Wraps

sarma thaiwraps 01 GreenChef Sarma Melngailis | Spicy Thai Vegetable Wraps

Spicy Thai Vegetable Wraps
with tamarind dipping sauce (raw)

Tamarind pulp can be found as cellophane-wrapped, sun-dried bricks in Asian, Latin, and Indian markets. Tamarind pulp is the sticky interior of pods that grow on a variety of evergreen tree originally native to Africa. Tamarind, which is very intense in flavor, lends sweet-and-sour notes to dishes. Because the pulp usually contains seeds, you should always strain it before use. Pull off an amount appropriate to your needs and soak it in warm, purified water for about 15 minutes. Then strain the pulp and liquid through a fine-mesh colander into a bowl to catch the usable diluted pulp, leaving the seeds and fibers caught in the mesh. (Discard what’s left in the strainer.)

Recipe by Sarma Mengailis | Raw Food Real World (Harper Collins, 2005)

Makes 12 Wraps

For the wraps:

1/2 cup chopped raw cashews (dehydrated, if preferred)

1 tablespoon sesame oil

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

1/4 cup maple syrup

1/2 cup lemon juice

2 tablespoons chopped ginger

1 tablespoon chipped red chile, seeds included

1 1/2 tablespoons nama shoyu

1 cup raw almond butter

1/2 head savoy cabbage, shredded

6 very large collard green leaves

1 large carrot, cut into matchstick-size pieces

1 large ripe mango, cut lengthwise into strips, about 1/4-inch thick

2 cups bean sprouts

1 handful cilantro leaves

1 handful torn basil leaves

1/2 handful mint leaves (torn or cut if leaves are large)

Continue Reading / See Additional Photos

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